Columbus Day 2017: Why more and more cities are celebrating Indigenous People’s Day instead

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The move by Austin, Texas, Salt Lake City, Utah and Los Angeles and San Luis, California comes as part of a growing movement to change Columbus Day - celebrated on the second Monday in October - to Indigenous Peoples' Day as a way to recognise the oppression of Native Americans and celebrate. Generations of American schoolchildren have chanted this poem to celebrate the second Monday in October, Columbus Day, a U.S. federal holiday celebrating the “discovery” of America by 15th Century explorer Christopher Columbus. But the day has long aroused the sadness and ire of Native Americans.

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“Celebrating Columbus is a narrative that celebrates genocide and invasion,” said SDSU NASA president Marissa Mendoza. “Our education system has failed us in many ways, and it's erasing Native Americans from history books.” Mendoza said the main goal of the rally is to abolish Columbus Day and. Four states in America have already committed to celebrating Indigenous Peoples' Day or Native American Day in place of Columbus Day: Minnesota, Vermont, Alaska, and South Dakota. In an official proclamation Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton highlighted the contributions Indigenous people.


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